Leibniz philosophical essays

A final key principle worth noting is the principle of continuity. “Nothing takes place suddenly, and it is one of my great principles that nature never makes leaps ,” Leibniz writes in the New Essays . “I call this the Law of continuity” (NE 56). All change is continuous; there is never a leap, but rather a series of intervening stages. This principle is especially germane to Leibniz’s development of the infinitesimal calculus, but relevant too to his metaphysics and epistemology.

This is similar to the Medieval suggestion since, according to classical theology, God is necessarily without defect or infirmity, so that, if the action A requires a defect or infirmity, (2) does not require that God, in order to count as omnipotent, should be able to do it. However, (2) runs into the famous 'McEar' counter-example (Plantinga 1967: 170; La Croix 1977: 183). Suppose that it is a necessary truth about a certain being, known as McEar, that the only action he performs is scratching his ear. It follows that, if McEar can scratch his ear, he is omnipotent, despite his inability to do anything else. This result is clearly unacceptable.

An English translation of EXPLANATION OF BINARY ARITHMETIC by Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz , from 1703

Leibniz managed to delay his arrival in Hanover until the end of 1676 after making one more short journey to London, where Newton accused him of having seen Newton's unpublished work on calculus in advance. [35] This was alleged to be evidence supporting the accusation, made decades later, that he had stolen calculus from Newton. On the journey from London to Hanover, Leibniz stopped in The Hague where he met van Leeuwenhoek , the discoverer of microorganisms. He also spent several days in intense discussion with Spinoza , who had just completed his masterwork, the Ethics . [36]

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leibniz philosophical essays

Leibniz philosophical essays

Leibniz managed to delay his arrival in Hanover until the end of 1676 after making one more short journey to London, where Newton accused him of having seen Newton's unpublished work on calculus in advance. [35] This was alleged to be evidence supporting the accusation, made decades later, that he had stolen calculus from Newton. On the journey from London to Hanover, Leibniz stopped in The Hague where he met van Leeuwenhoek , the discoverer of microorganisms. He also spent several days in intense discussion with Spinoza , who had just completed his masterwork, the Ethics . [36]

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leibniz philosophical essays

Leibniz philosophical essays

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leibniz philosophical essays

Leibniz philosophical essays

An English translation of EXPLANATION OF BINARY ARITHMETIC by Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz , from 1703

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leibniz philosophical essays
Leibniz philosophical essays

Leibniz managed to delay his arrival in Hanover until the end of 1676 after making one more short journey to London, where Newton accused him of having seen Newton's unpublished work on calculus in advance. [35] This was alleged to be evidence supporting the accusation, made decades later, that he had stolen calculus from Newton. On the journey from London to Hanover, Leibniz stopped in The Hague where he met van Leeuwenhoek , the discoverer of microorganisms. He also spent several days in intense discussion with Spinoza , who had just completed his masterwork, the Ethics . [36]

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Leibniz philosophical essays

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leibniz philosophical essays

Leibniz philosophical essays

This is similar to the Medieval suggestion since, according to classical theology, God is necessarily without defect or infirmity, so that, if the action A requires a defect or infirmity, (2) does not require that God, in order to count as omnipotent, should be able to do it. However, (2) runs into the famous 'McEar' counter-example (Plantinga 1967: 170; La Croix 1977: 183). Suppose that it is a necessary truth about a certain being, known as McEar, that the only action he performs is scratching his ear. It follows that, if McEar can scratch his ear, he is omnipotent, despite his inability to do anything else. This result is clearly unacceptable.

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leibniz philosophical essays

Leibniz philosophical essays

An English translation of EXPLANATION OF BINARY ARITHMETIC by Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz , from 1703

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leibniz philosophical essays

Leibniz philosophical essays

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Leibniz philosophical essays

We are in the process of creating audio books for selected texts. Our pilot project is Mary Wollstonecraft's masterpiece, the reading of which is still being done; you can listen to as much of it as now exists by clicking here .

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Leibniz philosophical essays

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